BASIC ENGLISH III


How often do you


Do you want me to + (verb)
To 'want' is to feel or have a desire for. When saying 'Do you want me to' you're asking someone if there is anything you can do for them or assist them with.

Here are some examples:

"
Do you want me to pick up the kids?"
"
Do you want me to fix your flat tire?"
"
Do you want me to help you read that book?"
"
Do you want me to remind you?"
"
Do you want me to remove my shoes?"

The word 'want' can also be used to express something YOU would like someone else to do or that something you personally would enjoy.

Here are some examples:

"
I want you to come over."
"
I want you to make a decision."
"
I want you to water the flowers."
"
I want to understand what you are trying to say."
"
I want to be better at swimming."
"
I want to be more involved at church."

What do you think about (verb-ing)

Why don't we + (verb)

It's too bad that
'Too bad' means regrettable or unfortunate. When using it in a sentence you are expressing a concern or regret for what has taken place. The topic being discussed could have happened to you, the person you are talking to, or someone or something else.

Here are some examples:

"
It's too bad that she lost her job."
"
It's too bad that you have to go."
"
It's too bad that I found out about it."
"
It's too bad we will not be there on time."
"
It's too bad that tickets are all gone to that concert."
"
It's too bad that it is supposed to rain."
"
It's too bad that she got hurt."
"
It's too bad that my work has to lay off people."
"
It's too bad that you do not understand."

You could have + (past participle)

If I were you, I would + (verb)

That's why + (subject + verb)

It's time to + (verb)

The point is that + (subject + verb)

How was + (noun)
By using the words 'how was' you are asking someone a question about something that happened or something they did in the past.

Here are some examples:

"
How was your meeting?"
"
How was your doctor's appointment?"
"
How was the birthday party?"
"
How was lunch?"
"
How was the airplane ride?"
"
How was vacation?"
"
How were your parents?"
"
How were roads when you drove home?"
"
How were people acting after what happened?"
"
How were holidays with the family?"

How about + (verb-ing)

It looks like + (noun)
You could be describing how something is similar or appears to be by the way it looks.

Here are some examples:

"
It looks like a balloon."
"
It looks like a jellyfish."
"
It looks like a banana."
"
It looks like a fish."
You can also use 'it looks like' to describe something that might be in the future.

Here are some examples:

"
It looks like it's going to rain."
"
It looks like it's going to be fun."
"
It looks like it's going to be a long day."

You can also use it to describe something in the present tense.

Here are some examples:

"
It looks like they are leaving."
"
It looks like he is waving to us."
"
It looks like she is lost."
"
It looks like they are racing."

It's gonna be + (adjective)
You're informing someone what something is going to be like. This could be something you are going to do, see or feel.

Here are some examples:

"
It's going to be delicious."
"
It's gonna be easy."
"
It's gonna be depressing."
"
It's going to be exciting."
"
It's going to be disgusting."

You can also add 'he or she' or a person's name to describe how they might react to something.

Here are some examples:

"
He is going to be tough to deal with."
"
He is going to be terrific at that."
"
She is going to be relieved to hear that."
"
She is going to be scared after watching that movie."
"
Sally is going to be successful."
"
Mike is going to be grumpy after I tell him."

What if + (subject + verb)
Here you are asking a question about 'in the event of' or 'in the event that.' Usually you are looking for an answer at the time of the question that is being asked.

Here are some examples:

"
What if I miss the bus?"
"
What if I were late to dinner?"
"
What if I called her tomorrow?"
"
What if I don't understand?"
"
What if someone sees me?"
"
What if no one is home?"
"
What if they decide to stay?"
"
What if it rains while we are camping?"
"
What if I do not finish on time?"
"
What if we introduce ourselves first?"

How much does it cost to + (verb)

How come + (subject + verb)

What are the chances of + (verb-ing)
By asking 'what are the chances of' you are wondering how often or in what case would a particular thing happen.

Here are some examples:

"
What are the chances of getting tickets?"
"
What are the chances of that happening?"
"
What are the chances of it raining today?"
"
What are the chances of winning the lottery?"

When replacing the word 'the' with 'your' or 'our' you can ask what the chances 'personally' that the topic will happen.

Here are some examples:

"
What are the chances of you staying home today?"
"
What are your chances of getting the job?"
"
What are your chances of improving?"
"
What are your chances of moving?"
"
What are our chances of staying together?"
"
What are our chances of working together?"
"
What are our chances of going together?"

There is something wrong with + (noun)

Let's not + (verb)
The word 'let's' is formed from the words 'let us.' Here you are requesting that something not take place at this moment or that what is happening needs to be contained or lessened.

Here are some examples:

"
Let's not discuss this now."
"
Let's not stay here too long."
"
Let's not stop anywhere on the way."
"
Let's not remain mad at each other."
"
Let's not meddle in other people's business."
"
Let us not get too excited."
"
Let us not worry too much."
"
Let us not interrupt them when they are talking."
"
Let us help you."
"
Let us get that for you."

Let's say that + (subject + verb)

There's no need to + (verb)
The word 'there's' is a contraction of the words 'there is' or 'there has.' When expressing 'no need' you are stating that the action does not need to take place.

Here are some examples:

"
There's no need to worry."
"
There's no need to be upset."
"
There's no need to act so strange."
"
There's no need to act so shy."
"
There's no need to rush off."
"
There's no need to talk now."
"
There is no need to call this late."
"
There is no need to bother him."
"
There is no need to run away."
"
There is no need to stop now."

It takes + (time) + to + (verb)

Please make sure that + (subject + verb)

Here's to + (noun)
'Here's to' is used in a way of celebrating or identifying a person, place, or thing of significance. It is usually said while toasting someone at dinner, or signaling to someone or something after an event.

Here are some examples:

"
Here's to the winner!"
"
Here's to your marriage!"
"
Here's to the New Year!"
"
Here's to great friends!"
"
Here's to starting a new job!"
"
Here is to the luckiest guy in the world!"
"
Here is to you!"
"
Here is to happiness!"
"
Here is to a wonderful day!"
"
Here is to great memories!"

It's no use + (verb-ing)
'It's' is a contraction for 'it is.' By stating 'it's no use' you are saying that what you or someone else is doing is not recommended or uncalled for.

Here are some examples:

"
It's no use crying."
"
It's no use separating them."
"
It's no use talking to her."
"
It's no use whining about it."
"
It's no use apologizing."
"
It's no use attempting to please him."
"
It's no use arguing about it."
"
It's no use behaving that way."
"
It's no use cleaning up."
"
It's no use checking on it yet."

There's no way + (subject + verb)

It's very kind of you to + (verb)

There's nothing + (subject) + can + (verb)
'There's' is a contraction of the words 'there is.' When using the word 'nothing' you are suggesting that something cannot happen or be done.

Here are some examples:

"
There's nothing you can harm."
"
There's nothing the police can identify."
"
There's nothing we can agree on."
"
There's nothing we can join."
"
There's nothing she can cook."
"
There's nothing my dog can learn."

By using the word 'can' or 'can't' you change the expression to mean that all is possible.

Here are some examples:

"
There is nothing I cannot ask for."
"
There's nothing we cannot accomplish."
"
There's nothing our dog cannot open."
"
There's nothing that truck cannot move."

Rumor has it that + (subject + verb)

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